Who is Liable for a Scaffolding Accident?

>Scaffolding Accident

Scaffolding allows workers to reach heights while constructing new buildings or repairing structures. When erected and used properly, they provide workers a safer and more efficient alternative to ladders. However, scaffolding accidents happen quite often on construction sites. In fact, the leading cause of construction accident deaths is "falls" - a term that includes falls from scaffoldings. Several parties may be held liable for scaffolding accidents, including:

General contractors: General contractors, if they:

  • failed to repair damaged scaffoldings or neglected to maintain the scaffoldings
  • failed to oversee the assembly of scaffoldings
  • did not ensure that subcontractors were meeting all safety standards on site
  • failed to provide overhead protection for workers
  • required workers to work during storm or high wind conditions on the scaffoldings

Sub-contractors: Sub-contractors, if they:

  • moved scaffoldings while they were occupied
  • assembled scaffoldings incorrectly
  • failed to use taglines to secure materials during hoisting
  • loaded the scaffoldings with more weight than they could bear

  • Manufacturers: It is the responsibility of manufacturers to ensure that scaffoldings are safe before they are put on the market. If they suffer from manufacturing defects and break, malfunction, and cause accidents, manufacturers can be held liable.
    Other potential parties: In certain situations, individuals with decision-making power of the construction site projects can be held responsible for scaffolding accidents even if they were not directly involved in the assembly or maintenance process.

    Contact Us

    If you are hurt in a scaffolding accident, you may file a claim for compensation. The law firm of Marvin A. Cooper, P.C. specializes in construction accident cases. Our team of aggressive, experienced and dedicated construction accident lawyers are dedicated to providing exceptional representation. Call 914-357-8911 or 718-619-4215 or email whc@cooper-law.com.

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